Stem Cells

Embryonic stem cells (ES cells or ESCs) are pluripotent stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst, an early-stage pre-implantation embryo. Human embryos reach the blastocyst stage 4–5 days post fertilization, at which time they consist of 50–150 cells. Isolating the embryoblast, or inner cell mass (ICM) results in destruction of the blastocyst, a process which raises ethical issues, including whether or not embryos at the pre-implantation stage should have the same moral considerations as embryos in the post-implantation stage of development.

Waking Up with Sam Harris #73 – Forbidden Knowledge (with Charles Murray)

The Waking Up Podcat #73 – Forbidden Knowledge:

A Conversation with Charles Murray

Twitter: @charlesmurray

In this episode of the Waking Up podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Charles Murray about the controversy over his book The Bell Curve, the validity and significance of IQ as a measure of intelligence, the problem of social stratification, the rise of Trump, universal basic income, and other topics.

Charles Murray is a political scientist and author. His 1994 New York Times bestseller, The Bell Curve (coauthored with the late Richard J. Herrnstein), sparked heated controversy for its analysis of the role of IQ in shaping America’s class structure. Murray’s other books include What It Means to Be a Libertarian, Human Accomplishment, and In Our Hands. His 2012 book, Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010 describes an unprecedented divergence in American classes over the last half century.

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(Photo via the Mukashi Mukashi Photography)

Waking Up With Sam Harris #62 – What is True? (with Jordan B. Peterson)

In this episode of the Waking Up podcast, Sam Harris speaks with psychologist Jordan B. Peterson about freedom of speech and the nature of truth.

Jordan B. Peterson is a clinical psychologist and Professor at the University of Toronto. He formerly taught at Harvard University and has published numerous articles on drug abuse, alcoholism, and aggression. He is the author of Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief.

Waking Up With Sam Harris #57 – An Evening with Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris (1)

In this episode of the Waking Up podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Richard Dawkins at a live event in Los Angeles (first of two). They cover religion, Jurassic Park, artificial intelligence, elitism, continuing human evolution, and other topics.

Waking Up with Sam Harris #61 – The Power of Belief (with Lawrence Wright)

In this episode of the Waking Up podcast, Sam Harris speaks with author Lawrence Wright about al-Qaeda & ISIS, Arab culture, 9/11 conspiracy theories, the migrant crisis in Europe, Scientology, parallels between L. Ron Hubbard and Donald Trump, the Satanic cult panic, and other topics.

Lawrence Wright is an author, screenwriter, playwright, and a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine. His works of nonfiction include In the New World, Remembering Satan, The Looming Tower, Going Clear, and Thirteen Days in September. He has also written a novel, God’s Favorite. His books have received many prizes and honors, including a Pulitzer Prize for The Looming Tower. His most recent book is The Terror Years: From al-Qaeda to the Islamic State.

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For more interesting articles, visit: Kemk

Jedes Kind kennt Gut und Böse: Wie das Gewissen entsteht

http://amzn.to/2jJzieb

Böse Kinder gibt es nicht. Kaum auf der Welt, haben sie schon ein feines Gespür für Gut und Böse. In Langzeitstudien konnte Paul Bloom beobachten, wie die ganz Kleinen bereits Gefühle wie Mitleid, Schuld und Scham zeigen, gutes Verhalten bei anderen belohnen und schlechtes bestrafen. Der renommierte Entwicklungspsychologe der Yale University führt aus, wie sich das angeborene Mitgefühl weiterentwickelt und wie Eltern und Erzieher die natürlichen Anlagen der Kinder zum Guten und ihren Sinn für Gerechtigkeit zur Entfaltung bringen können.

»Ein Muss für alle Eltern und alle sozialwissenschaftlich Interessierten.« Dan Ariely

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

“Der renommierte Entwicklungspsychologe der Yale University führt aus, wie sich das angeborene Mitgefühl weiterentwickelt und wie Eltern und Erzieher die natürlichen Anlagen der Kinder zum Guten und in ihrem Sinn für Gerechtigkeit zur Entfaltung bringten können”
lernwel.at, 01.08.2014

“Es sind Widersprüche (..), denen Paul Bloom nachgeht. Er hat kein Wohlfühlbuch geschrieben, das einen geradlinigen Weg vom Moralsinn des Babys hin zu einem Immanuel Kant oder John Stuart Mill aufzeigt. Denn trotz ihrer biologischen Basis sei Moral keine Selbstverständlichkeit, betont der Psychologe.”
Deutschlandradio Kutlur (online), 08.06.2015

“‘Jedes Kind kennt Gut und Böse’ zieht ein vorläufiges Fazit eines jungen Forschusfeldes, das noch viele offene Fragen und widersprüchliche Ergebnisse beinhaltet.”
Main-Echo, 15.04.2015

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Paul Bloom ist Professor für Psychologie an der Yale University. Er ist Träger zahlreicher Wissenschaftspreise und einer der führenden Intellektuellen der USA. Er schreibt häufig u.a. für die Zeitschriften: “The New York Times Magazine”, “The Atlantic”, “Science”, “Slate”, “The Best American Science Writing”. Bloom lebt mit seiner Frau und zwei Söhnen in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

http://www.droemer-knaur.de/buch/7986300/jedes-kind-kennt-gut-und-boese

You are a Simulation & Physics Can Prove It: George Smoot at TEDxSalford

Astrophysicist, cosmologist and Nobel Prize winner George Smoot studies the cosmic microwave background radiation — the afterglow of the Big Bang. His pioneering research into deep space and time is uncovering the structure of the universe itself. He has also made a cameo appearance (as himself) in an episode of the ‘Big Bang Theory.’

George Smoot looks into the farthest reaches of space to the oldest objects in the known universe: fluctuations in the remnants of creation. Using data collected from satellites such as COBE and WMAP, scanning the cosmic microwave background radiation (a relic of the heat unleashed after the Big Bang), he probes the shape of the universe. In 1992 he and his Berkeley team discovered that the universe, once thought to be smooth and uniform at the largest scale, is actually anisotropic — or varied and lumpy. Smoot continues to investigate of the structure of the universe at the University of California at Berkeley, mapping billions of galaxies and filaments of dark matter in hope of uncovering the secrets of the universe’s origins.